Fondly yours.

i-come-by-it-honestly:

John Scalzi gets it.

52 minutes ago with 21,270 notes — via tariqk, © i-come-by-it-honestly



thethespacecoyote:

theloppyone:

a hand-lettering exercise that got really out of hand. oh well i like  my really unnecessarily grandiose welcome signs anyway :p

Oh no, these are amazing holy shit
53 minutes ago with 35,249 notes — via arineat, © theloppyone
#Welcome to Night Vale



"

One of the most troubling things about the AIDS epidemic is that it could have been stopped so easily by rolling out life-saving antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) early on. Not only do ARVs prevent HIV from developing into AIDS, they also reduce transmission rates and increase people’s willingness to get tested.

But Western pharmaceutical corporations have colluded in pricing these essential drugs way out of reach of the poor. When they were first introduced, patented ARVs cost up to $15,000 per yearly regimen. Generic producers were able to manufacture the same drugs for a mere fraction of the price, but the WTO outlawed this through the 1995 TRIPS agreement to protect Big Pharma’s monopoly.

It was not until 2003 that the WTO bowed to activist pressure and allowed southern Africa to import generics, but by then it was too late – HIV prevalence had already reached devastating proportions. In other words, much of the region’s AIDS burden can be directly attributed to the WTO’s rules and the corporations that defended them. And they are set to strike again: the WTO will cut patent exemptions for poor countries after 2016.

This dearth of basic drugs has gone hand in hand with the general collapse of public health institutions. Structural adjustment and WTO trade policies have forced states to cut spending on hospitals and staff in order to repay odious debts to the West. Swaziland, ground-zero in the world of AIDS, has been hit hard by these cuts. When I last visited I found that many once-bustling clinics are now empty and dilapidated. Neoliberalism has systematically destroyed the first line of defence against AIDS.

The point I want to drive home is that the policies that deny poor people access to life-saving drugs and destroy public healthcare come from the same institutions and interests that helped create the conditions for HIV transmission in the first place.

"
17 hours ago with 8,223 notes — via tariqk, © rs620



tariqk:

rincrocker:

this only has 800 something notes and that is seriously fucking sad

I’ve been digging through the notes to see if anyone has actually said anything about this, and I’m not seeing a lot of things.

Look. It really does suck that you received a death threat. It really is. That shouldn’t happen, but it did, and it sucks.

But. I mean, I don’t know what your situation is, really, but hey, I come from a South-East Asian country that regularly persecutes and prosecutes people for not complying with being conservative Malay Muslim, hetero-normative cis-male straight dude. I’m lucky in the sense that I am a cis-gender straight Malay Muslim dude who’s relatively well-off, and all I have to really worry about is someone picking on me for being more lefty than the typical Malay yuppie, but that’s it.

Basically the previous paragraph is me rambling about how, despite the fact that I live in a pretty fucking conservative country, I have enough support that Tumblr isn’t really a place that I need to escape from bullying. So I really don’t know how you’re feeling about that.

But I have friends who aren’t straight, or cis, or male. I have friends who aren’t as financially secure. And they can get frustrated, and they can get mad. And yes, they say things like #killallmen, and yeah, I’ve seen “cis scum”, too.

And here’s the thing: I don’t mind, when they say that. I mean, I get it — living day-to-day with an identity that the rest of society considers deviant, living in a place that considers you less-than-human… that shit is hard. The feelings you get can get pretty intense. You can be filled with anger and rage and hate.

I mean, the worst I’ve experienced, really, is Islamophobia, and there have been points where I get so mad I black out and see a bit of red. And that’s just one axis of oppression.

So, when I saw that you actually said that “not all cis people are like that…” and I closed my eyes and groaned. That is so not the thing to say. You don’t. You don’t tell someone who is bleeding who, who is raw, who is hurt that “it isn’t my fault! Whoever did this to you, it wasn’t me!” It doesn’t help, and really, it provides nothing. They’re still bleeding, they’re still raw, and all you’ve done is reassured yourself (and not even them, because who the fuck are you? They don’t know you) that you’re not the oppressor.

Except… aren’t you? Aren’t you taking away that space for them to scream in pain and yell and curse by telling them that they are “part of the problem”? What is this problem you are talking about? An entire society shits on them and, you know, bullies them, and all you can provide is… “I’m not like that!”? Really?

At best, you’ve done nothing to help the situation. At worst, you’re telling them that they can’t speak about their pain, at least not here, that your feelings are more important than their hurt.

Okay, so you’re a bit discomfited. So what? If you can’t help, go somewhere else. Or read up about the pain that they’re experiencing. Or go help. Someone is bleeding. Either bind their wounds competently, support them, or get the fuck out of the way.

And let me say this again, it really sucks that you received a death threat — but do you expect that someone lashing out at you in pain is in any state to cause you any further harm? When PSY rapped about killing American soldiers because they rape and kill his people, do you think he’s in any position to kill American soldiers? Fuck no; hell, he had to fucking apologize. When someone says that America should burn because of what they did, do you think they’re in any position to actually make that shit happen? Not really.

They’re too busy getting shit on.

The problem here, really, isn’t that no one should be bullied. The problem here is that sometimes, people need to vent, sometimes they need space to yell their pain, because the world is unfair, and they’re in pain and they’re hurting. And sometimes, when you come in and poke at that wound — I know you didn’t mean it, but that’s what happened — people are going to hit back.

It really sucks, what happened. Don’t do it again.

18 hours ago with 56,015 notes — via tariqk, © alannacousland



highkeygay:

OHMYGOD

highkeygay:

OH
MY
GOD

18 hours ago with 76,833 notes — via gladiatorbitch, © saemiligr



thegestianpoet:

leonardhchekov:

Pushing Daisies (2007) || Hannibal (2013)

The Show Where Everything Is Yellow (2007) || The Show Where Everything Is Blue (2013)

19 hours ago with 6,966 notes — via do-you-have-a-flag, © leonardhchekov
#pushing daisies #Hannibal #Gina Torres #raul esparza #ellen greene #molly shannon #gifset #gif



johnasavoia:

same, dude

johnasavoia:

same, dude

20 hours ago with 15,455 notes — via do-you-have-a-flag
#QBO



karadin:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.
At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.
The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.
What do you see?
Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.
The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.
This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

*example - any infographic on Faux News

karadin:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.

At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.

The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.

What do you see?

Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.

The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.

This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

*example - any infographic on Faux News

21 hours ago with 1,132 notes — via bittersweetart, © socimages



fonbella:

holavicente:

How to fuck with anime fans:
Step 1) put a wig on your dog
Step 2)

first of all HOW DARE YOU

fonbella:

holavicente:

How to fuck with anime fans:

Step 1) put a wig on your dog

Step 2)

first of all HOW DARE YOU

1 day ago with 58,611 notes — via paperpinwheel, © holavicente
#fullmetal alchemist



penryyn:

how the hell do you cancel a show like this

1 day ago with 28,904 notes — via do-you-have-a-flag, © ailesdefee
#Firefly #Simon Tam #Sean Maher